21 blog posts series ease eight

21 blog posts series ease eight

Eight: “The curse of social media”

Love it or hate it, social media is something that has marched into our lives with some amount of force. Gone are the days of giving the love on Bebo, sending mini messages on MSN or updating your presence on Myspace. Bigger players have taken the scene and trust me, it’s hard to block out the bad form the worthwhile in the online world even more than it is in reality.

The outliers who have chosen to avoid social media have proven to me that it can be something good. These examples are the infamous Ed Sheeran who threw his phone away and went on a years hiatus. Not saying that’s something that could really be in our paths, but it’s not something to be knocked either. My aunt is giving up social media for Lent and I think that’s a little bit more up our alley for the minute.

I think social media really can draw us in and with the constant updates available by simply refreshing a page or feed – you can really get trapped online sometimes where it’s very hard to switch off (literally). The fear of missing out is a factor, whether this be a Facebook competition, a funny meme or a shocking Snapchat story. Is it a crime to miss the latest scandal, a Snapchat streak or a Twitter argument between two celebs? I’d like to think it isn’t but I strongly believe that social media is growing in power.

Actually, there’s a lot of similarity going on across the boards of social media. Within the last couple of months, Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat have gotten quite similar and maybe that makes it easier to update them all. I don’t know about you, but I preferred when each had something different to offer and I’m just not sure if that’s going to continue to be case.

I ask you this honestly, do you think that having social media accounts now is essential for living in the world? As regards jobs, more and more now businesses of all types have social media accounts and it can be seen as essential that employees have something to contribute on that front if needs be. Maybe social media is something now part of every day life that we can’t possibly avoid.

But that’s not to say that there aren’t some toxic things out there. Social media encourages gossip and even the very real and annoying, “keyboard warriors”. I don’t know what it is that makes people think they’re more powerful when looking at a screen than someone in the eye. It’s hard to know whether we are unintentionally contributing to this world of social media. As it’s primarily us providing the content for the most part on these various platforms.

I sometimes find social media as a huge place for unfiltered bragging and sometimes people can share to much leaving nothing really else left to know about a person. Is that the best way to live and allow people to get to know you? How much of that is real? I’m no psychologist but it’d be interesting to see how having a high social media following could affect a persons self-esteem. Friends or followers, which is better for a person socially (without the media part)?

One thing I find to be the real curse of social media is that of the time stolen from us by it. Time does not seem to exist when it comes to social media as it can really hook a person and I feel social media demands our time. But it could be us after all that are placing high importance on it. So take a step back, it’s actually not that important.

All images used are from my personal Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/cathyleex/

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Review: The Tempest – broadcast from Stratford-Upon-Avon

tempest

By Cathy Lee

On Wednesday January 11, I had the pleasure of seeing a Shakespeare play alongside one of my very good friends. We both share an interest in things literary and I was delighted to be invited to see this showing of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest”.

What was different about this experience of Shakespeare was although I was watching one of his fantastic plays, it wasn’t on stage. In fact it was playing out on a large screen at the Eye Cinema, Galway. I was delighted to discover that despite the sounds of people crunching popcorn around me, it would be a great night of theatre – while not being at the theatre.

The Royal Shakespeare Company of London broadcast their performances to cinemas every couple of months. This really is a modern way to do Shakespeare. Don’t get me wrong, I love the theatre and seeing a play like any regular enthusiast but honestly I really wouldn’t knock the cinema experience. It was something entirely different and the quality of acting and producing was really outstanding. We were in awe of the story itself as it varied from scenes of disaster and hopelessness combined with comedy, love and relationships as well as final friendship in unlikely circumstances.

The story of The Tempest is well known and often told, given the amount of years it has been around for. But whole-heartedly, this version of the play was something utterly different and fell perfectly into the 21st century with the audience responding well also .When the director Gregory Doran, producer Pete Griffin and actor Mark Quartley, who plays the spirit Ariel, were interviewed during the intervals, you could truly see how much work was put into this production. This was something I suppose you wouldn’t get with regular theatre.

The play looks at the exile of a well-respected man, Prospero, played by Simon Russell Beale and his beloved daughter, Miranda (Jenny Rainsford) to an island with some magical qualities. There is a ship wreckage, how we are introduced to the tale, and a lot more people end up on this island than just the man and his daughter. We discover more about the slave to the family Caliban and the friend to Prospero, the magical spirit Ariel throughout the play.

While the play looks at the interaction between the royal sailors and the family, it also thoroughly explores the emotional relationship between father and daughter. The idea of moving on within the life-course and giving over to somebody else’s happiness being put before your own is looked at in detail. The principle character has to come to terms with his past as well as accepting the future that he wishes his daughter to have.

Quality of life is tested throughout the play, as the characters individually wish for more for themselves. This exploration of this puts into question who is good and who is evil in this tale. Described as Shakespeare’s most magical play, the technical enhancement to portray these magical elements played a huge role in the success of the play. It really was the highlight and could be particularly seen with the character Ariel, to bring his magical qualities well and truly to life. This was done through special lighting, voice-changing, colour and a high-tech costume that allowed a completely new portrayal.

I now know that the dusty copy I own of The Tempest will soon be coming off the book shelf as the play is very relevant to modern times. Sometimes the satellite buffered, but overall it didn’t take a lot away from the play.  The experience was quite interactive and you could also tweet your reactions as the play was being broadcast. This was certainly a very modern take on a classic and I had to agree with actor Mark Quartley, that it was something bold and daring that Shakespeare himself would have been proud of.

Photo: credit to site https://www.rsc.org.uk/the-tempest/about-the-play

A Message amidst madness series: Taking Alternative routes.

By Cathy Lee

Have you ever stopped to ask yourself why you choose one way rather than the other? Let’s take for example, your walk to college or walk or your system of commute.

Can you remember the first time you went that way, and why you did?

Did it stand out to you or present you with something good? Did it lure you in?

Think now about how much of an impact this has had on you now. It is now part of your regular routine, you must spend the majority of your days on this route.

It has become part of your life.

I believe politics to be the same.

There was a general election in Ireland just recently on February 26th  2016.

National media described it as a “very different” election and in turn will create a very diverse Dail.

But why is it different?

You may have seen the hashtag ‘ge16’ on Twitter (it even had a little Irish flag automatically attached

For me it meant travelling back to my home town of Wicklow, over 200km from where I’m living currently to attend college.

I know from those I met at the polling station that much more also travelled home to cast their vote and valued having their views counted.

I think for once I was proud of my hometown simply because the people were willing to branch out and away from the FF/FG politics.

This was not the case for the nation as a whole.

Wicklow saw over half of the people gave their first preference to neither Fianna Fail nor Fine Gael.

In Wicklow Stephen Donnelly was elected on first count when he soared over the quota. He was elected in 2011 as an Independent candidate and just this year he co-formed a new party, the Social Democrats.

I was overwhelmed to see this as it really surprised me the courage that my constituency took to try new paths.

Now this doesn’t mean that the Fine Gael or Fianna Fail didn’t make the cut, they did too.

But it’s the one that tops polls that sticks in the mind and captures the coverage.

I was talking to a Galway woman about it who remarked that Wicklow did “something weird didn’t they?”

I chuckled when she said this, also mentioning that Galway East were the same with an Independent Alliance candidate topping polls.

Honestly, I’m happy to be classed with the weirdos if it means some actual change.

Why can’t we give the alternatives a chance to change the curve?

I don’t see how it doesn’t worry everyone that ever since the foundation of the state, it’s only ever been a majority led Dail government of Fianna Fail or Fine Gael.

I study journalism and politics in college so as you may have guessed that I was interested. I had been speaking prior to the elections to many media-types and political analysists, ever since about October.

I think it was only a very few who thought Fianna Fail would make such a comeback.

Looking back to the leaving certificate, after studying Shakespeare’s tragedy Macbeth I learned not to trust predictions.

I think that lesson could be seen again here as the count results came flooding in quite random order over the days following the election.

I woke up on Saturday morning and my dad left for work saying “it looks like Fianna Fail” are coming up.

I slipped back into the pillow and picked up my phone to check Twitter immediately.

I checked my sources which were an article on the journal.ie, independent.ie.. it was all true.

I checked Facebook. Saw a friend’s status claiming that those who had voted Fianna Fail had done an injustice to the nation.

I couldn’t make sense of it. After some thought, I came up with this.

In my mind, this election for some presented this:

“I don’t like the current government. What options do I have? I haven’t looked to any other new parties and sure independents can’t get a word in. My options then are Fianna Fail or Sinn Fein. It’s embedded in me to have a fear of ‘what Sinn Fein would do if they were in government’. I’ll vote Fianna Fail then.”

This is a simple break down. It may be way off.

I can’t predict the future, as I said Mr. Macbeth taught me. But in the next while we’ll see if the old roots will creep back up and blossom.

And this was your choice.