Caca Dana Review: “All the World’s A Cage” – By Niamh Ryan

Caca Dana Review: “All the World’s A Cage” – By Niamh Ryan

By Cathy Lee

The brilliant “All The World’s A Cage” engages and grips an audience from the beginning. On entering the small secluded dimly lit made-to-do theatre at “The Teachers Club” Dublin 1, the actors we had not yet been introduced to were already present on the background of the stage. This set a relaxed sort of mood into the air as the stage was at ground level, we relaxed into the comfortable couch-like audience seats and all I could experience was the feeling of curiosity the entertainment to come, and I wasn’t to be disappointed by this expectation! I would wholeheartedly describe this play as another success for the fantastic playwright and star Niamh Ryan, who plays “Jill”.

The very limited stage space was essential and fitting for the story. This one room setting exposed the character of the lives that the three young women held together, tightly bound in a not exactly cluttered scenario but one of great importance we are to learn to each of them, particularly “Tina” – played by Marie Hegarty. We discover each of these young women, graduated from college in Galway in their early 20s, as we watch the hilarious lack of interaction unfold between the ladies and the driven TV License inspector. We later discover that maybe indeed that this authoritarian figure isn’t the only one of his kind in their lives. Be it boyfriends, co-workers or closed-minded directors – these young women are really up against it.

The placement of individual striking lines in the play were exceptional for me as they were very captivating and allowed me to further my belief in the talents of Niamh Ryan as a script writer. Most of the comedy was physical at the beginning of the play, from yoga fitness moves of “Jill” to exaggerated facial expressions of “Amy” and the improper placement of some lemons and limes. But as the themes of feminism and power in the play further, lines from Tina and of course Jill, played by Niamh Ryan were hard hitting and to the point.

I found the characters to be strong with each possessing a distinct individuality and their own world view, strongly expressed at differing points in the play. Niamh Ryan as “Jill” and Katie Reid as “Amy” were headstrong and often outrageous bringing in heavily the humour and dominance into the scenes but I feel too that “Tina” played a distinct role in balancing out the possibly deeper strength of characters in the acting of Niamh Ryan and Katie Reid.

The play addressed a form of modern day millennial message or struggle and a strong feminine message which broke down barriers of fear in that of being a woman, the restrictions and draw backs found that we see existing here as the story unfolds. Through strong will and true togetherness in friendship, the girls overcome their challenges and the energy within the play can be felt, through the honesty of humour and the true sense of belief in one another as women and as good friends.

Although the play only held one setting due to the limited stage space available, the actors made this work through their use of physical space to depict time passing and also the excellent use of selective lighting present was visually important. Props were used to a good affect, from the weapons to the couch – which both united and separated the girls at different stages. I think this also added some colour to the play in a different way than the strong comedy did, as sometimes the atmosphere was dreary as the sense of hopelessness became present for the characters at their current and somewhat fixed reality.

Niamh Ryan is clearly a multi-talented young woman, with excellent script writing skills and is a capable actress herself included. Having seen another Caca Dana production “Eternal Youth” before,” All The World’s A Cage” showed me a new side to the writing of Niamh Ryan and I think her talents are very diverse with the potential for a vast future to explore, which audiences of all kinds should enjoy.

I wish the team at Caca Dana Theatre company all the best for their ventures stateside and I look forward to their future productions, wherever they may be. You can check out their website here for further information: https://www.cdtheatreco.com/

Update on the blog

Hi guys,

If you’re reading this, happy 2017 to you. Fresh starts are wonderful things. I feel that’s what this blog needs.

2016 was a great year for blogging and I could see that when I attended the Irish Blog Awards back in September.

Unfortunately through no other fault than my own, I have neglected my blog since then.

I always find it’s hard to come back to something after a say “high” moment. I put pressure on myself to keep standards, no messing about on this my own platform.

But I would prefer if you all got an insight to something real. I’ve come to realise that every post of poem, article or story doesn’t have to be totally exceptional or outstanding.  It can just be a quite alright update – to keep you interested.

A good bit has happened in my life personally and journalistically speaking.

I intend to tell you all about it.

I’m also planning another series for the blog that should be ready to go this month so keep an eye for that!

Thanks for all your support so far with this, it has meant an awful lot and I sincerely mean that.

Here’s to 2017.

Cathy

A Message Amidst Madness Series: Dealing with Changing Times.

By Cathy Lee

Ireland is a place for decisive and divisive referenda.

The Divorce referendum of 1996 and of course The Marriage referendum of just last year come to mind.

Call me biased, but these all happened in my lifetime.

Last week the Literary and Debating Society in NUI Galway held a debate on whether or not to repeal the 8th Amendment of the constitution.

This of course is topical as it has been raised as an election issue currently, with some politicians showing their true colours as is to be expected.

But some politicians have been giving mixed messages about their stance on the matter.

About a year ago a Fine Gael TD claimed that he himself was pro-life in his stance but would agree with the need for his party to call a referendum on repealing the 8th and legalising abortion.

The term that first comes to mind during this time is “uncertainty” in these changing times.

We can’t be certain what’s to happen and what really defines “progress and change” to Irish politicians.

What is good for the country moving forward versus the sincerity in the views of Irish politicians seems to be an issue.

The government changed legislation in 2013 to make abortion accessible on the grounds of when a woman is showing signs of being suicidal.

Pro-Life campaigners were unhappy with this legislation and Galway representative for this campaign told me she’d like to see this legislation changed back to the way it was before 2013.

Although this legislation passed, you take the example of the “Ms Y” case of the same year (that is still ongoing) where the woman in question claimed to be suicidal and was still not able to access her own wishes to abort the foetus who had been conceived through rape.

Pro-Choice campaigners would prefer to have the 8th amendment of the constitution just be deleted and therefore avoiding any confusion around matters of defining whether a woman is sincere or not etc.

Deleted is a key word to this, as phrasing is so important when trying to convince the general public of complex views.

Last month national radio station NewsTalk launched their conversation campaign around Election 2016.

Their phrasing really struck me.

Their slogan was “Time to terminate the 8th?” with a photograph of a 6 month baby scan.

I couldn’t believe that this campaign was spread across the main billboard in my small home town.

(Just 100 metres away from the Catholic church too I might add).

We can experience bias when it comes to these referenda when we are presented with a fogged view of the reality.

When speaking to a local county councillor at home in Wicklow, he explained that a campaign to repeal the 8th would be certainly harder to achieve than other referenda.

With the “Yes Equality” campaign running up until last May, there were positive stories to tell about couples finding love and wishing to marry.

With abortion, often the stories are highly sensitive and not always positive.

But it also makes you wonder where all the losers on the side of these referenda go?

Do they just disappear off the radar when their views aren’t the majority?

Do those who voted “No” in the Marriage referendum boycott same-sex weddings or those who said “No” to divorce just force wedding rings back onto fingers now?

I understand everyone is entitled to their opinions and moral views on these topics, but it just get to wondering where is the future and will it actually facilitate everyone?

The conversation must be opened more instead of one side shunning the other’s views out.

Compromise is key in my view for this debate.

A Message Amidst Madness Series: Seeing people as real.

By Cathy Lee

So as it’s election season, this has brought focus to the chosen few in each constituency as to who is to represent and triumph at the polls.

The promises are thrown out and repeated on end, with the key words of “progression” and “prosperity” to be seen everywhere.

With posters shining above us upon most lamp posts and the odd fence, it’s easy to fall into a trap of seeing these running TDs as some new form of super-hero or celebrity.

I understand that these people are public figures, but it’s key to remember that these guys, although politicians, are still people at the end of it all.

Respecting somebodies status is a social phenomenon that we’ve all grown up with.

Such as respect your parents, respect your teachers, respect the priest, respect your boss.. and the list goes on.

But this week at the University of Limerick, RTE showcased the Party Leaders Debate, presented by journalist Claire Byrne.

I was very impressed to see that when questions were taken from the audience, the crowd had little fear to question the big bosses and ask them about their intentions.

I think this is only right and totally necessary.

If there’s one characteristic that running candidates or party leaders should have, it’s simply to be answerable.

(Not too much to ask from a person supposedly to be trusted with the running of our society.)

The way this election is going, there appears to be an act of desperation to get in rather than a practical approach to problem solving.

Don’t get me wrong that I’m being all preaching here, I know problem solving is hard.

I just don’t understand how in my home constituency of Wicklow, giving out Valentines cards from your local TDs, “refreshing” hand wipes or talk about going on the “Ferris-wheel” is really the target to assure a prosperous government to rely on for the future.

TDs want to be taken seriously but also want to win the sort of popularity contest that is currently going on.

These concepts can clash together creating confusion among the electorate.

A new approach is needed.

I believe that each person, as a citizen of this country, should be registered to vote and be informed.

If they are not, they can easily be manipulated by the next to nothing propaganda that’s happening at the moment of party-pushing.

It should be the standing obligation of our national government to make sure people are informed about the election process.

Instead TDs are acting somewhat manipulative, not thinking of the country as a whole rather their own career gains.

In recent elections, a lot of people had a change of mind on who to vote for within the last couple of days of the election.

These are fighting times, where it could really go either way.

Power and who holds it impacts, history has taught us that on many occasions.

So I encourage you to ask the TDs the hard questions, forget about their titles and make them earn your vote instead of a feeble attempt at buying it.

A friend recently told me a piece of advice that has been passed down through her family: “people may have their titles, their success and their status: but you must remember that they use the toilet in just the same way as you or I”.

 

 

 

A day in the Irish Independent Newspapers

You know you’re in a place that means business when once you walk in there’s a statue of ultimate journalist Veronica Guerin on the wall saying ‘Be Not Afraid’. You know you’re a place where real things happen when you see ‘Je suis Charlie’ posters plastered across the walls and desks of a newsroom. You know you’re in the real-life Irish Independent Newspapers when you’re seeing all this first hand for the first time.

My Sunday shift started at 11am. Although admittedly I spent until 11:20 at the front desk waiting for my mentor and guide for the day, the deputy editor of the Irish Independent, to arrive and whisk me away to the unknown. I wasn’t unhappy to wait though, I felt the need to take it all in. Behind the security of the front desk you can see a spread out logo list of all the news outlets run by the Irish Independent. These included The Herald, The Sunday World and http://www.Independent.ie.

Independent.ie is what I have to thank for getting me this opportunity. You see each week they choose a ‘Weekly Read’ article from the student college news site ‘Campus.ie’. My first article written for Campus.ie was about New Years resolutions and how you could adapt them into college life and this article was picked as the Weekly Read luckily enough.

I’m a first year journalism student studying in NUI Galway. Although I have some experience under my belt as a journalist, I’m certainly not a professional and I am without a degree as of yet. Needless to say the night before the shift the nerves had festered and the feeling of uncertainty had come over me. I wondered whether the Irish Independent would even take me seriously, I mean I was only there for the day.

As soon as the shift started I knew this was not the case. First up when I had got myself settled onto the third floor in the newsroom came a press release from a business company who had completed a survey on couples spending for Valentines story. I had to turn this into a 150 word piece (without providing the company with any free advertising) to capture the bigger picture of what this survey actually showed. I accepted this relatively small challenge and I was given help and guidance not before but after the article was written. I knew then that this day would be more on an ‘up to me’ basis than I had thought.

Challenge one complete and it was only 12 noon. Next up I had to do a report on the unlawful killing of a rare bird of prey. This was a sensitive one because this particular bird was a special with a huge online following and a local community involved in its care. A TD was on the phone to me telling me about the incident and the implications. People say you can’t trust politicians and maybe that’s true – I mean he did talk to me for a good five minutes and then requested not to be quoted. But it’s fine, he was quite helpful considering it was a Sunday.

Honestly there’s something you should know about Sundays and maybe some of you already do know. People don’t want to be talked to or pestered by journalists, especially on Sundays. My third article was one that I pitched to the editor, but to make it a good news story a good quote was needed. Quotes are hard things to come by I learned that day.

I spent my last hour and a half of the shift trying to get a decent quote for the piece but of course people either don’t answer their phones on Sundays or else leave you to wait until normal office hours.

But looking back now it was an excellent work experience. I mean I didn’t even have to make tea for anyone, I actually went for tea with one of the news journalists, and I was taken seriously. As contacts are so important in journalism, I was happy and honoured to be working alongside them all and thankfully they were all perfectly willing to help me out. It might have helped from that perspective that Sundays are quiet.

Although something on the opposite to that Sunday quiet was the sports department. All the sports people come in at about three in the afternoon and watch their games, commentate and write their reports while the TVs, laptops and radios roar in the background. It really was interesting to see this in action, although I did have to move chairs because one of the sports guys needed it.

Now I’m really grateful for the experience and although I don’t know whether I’ll be back for another shift, the deputy editor did tell me my writing was good and if I had any story ideas to just drop him a line and we’ll stay in contact that way. It’s tough to sum up a conclusion to the day but all I know is it meant a lot to me and I could see myself enjoying the experience if I was to work there for real.

Thanks for reading and I just realised this is my first blog post so hope it wasn’t too bad!

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